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Biodiversity Blog

 
Wildflowers of Texas: The angel trumpet, Datura Wrightii

Wildflowers of Texas: The angel trumpet, Datura Wrightii

A large white flower with a long tube is usually the telltale sign of a flower that blooms at night, since it is often adapted to pollination by long-tongued hawkmoths that only fly in the near-dark. Such is the case of the impressive (to about eight inches long) and beautiful flower of this species of jimsonweed. The fruit it produces is like a sp...
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Wildflowers of Texas: The prairie nymph, Herbertia lahue

Wildflowers of Texas: The prairie nymph, Herbertia lahue

This gorgeous flower makes a brief springtime appearance in Texas coastal prairies. It varies on color from blue to lavender. Flowering months: March, April, May. Photo: Dexter image collection, Plant Resources Center.Wildflowers of Texas project: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/exhibits/wildflowers/index.html
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The Daily Species: Lesser Siren (Siren intermedia)

The Daily Species: Lesser Siren (Siren intermedia)

The Lesser Siren (Siren intermedia) is a slender-bodied aquatic amphibian that spends its days burrowed in silt and debris at the bottom of slow waters. Sirens have a small pair of front legs but lack hind limbs, a loss thought to help them more easily swim through reeds and plants. During drought, they can secrete a protective mucus that cocoons t...
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The Daily Species: Western Ratsnake (Pantherophis obsoletus)

The Daily Species: Western Ratsnake (Pantherophis obsoletus)

The Western Ratsnake (Pantherophis obsoletus) is a non-venomous species commonly found across the eastern half of Texas. This species can be highly arboreal and is adaptable to a wide range of habitats.  Because of this versatility, they feed on a variety of prey (small mammals, birds, reptiles) that they kill by constriction. Ratsnakes are so...
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The Daily Species: Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

The Daily Species: Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor)

One of North America's most abundant butterflies, the pipevine swallowtail develops on the leaves of Aristolochia pipevine, sequestering the plant's potent toxins so as to remain poisonous to their own predators. The photographs of the hatching eggs (above) and adult butterfly (below) are public domain images created at UT ...
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