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Biodiversity Blog

 
Fire Ants and their Phorid Fly Foes: Brackenridge Field Lab and Biodiversity Collections Engage Visitors at UT Explore 2018

Fire Ants and their Phorid Fly Foes: Brackenridge Field Lab and Biodiversity Collections Engage Visitors at UT Explore 2018

UT Explore was held on Saturday March 3rd, drawing a large crowd of families, students, and teachers. The annual event seeks to encourage community interest in research and higher education, and the important impact UT has on Austin and the world at large.

The Terrifying Science Behind Floating Fire Ant Colonies

The Terrifying Science Behind Floating Fire Ant Colonies

Hurricane Harvey has revealed its magnitude through devastating floods and damages, and now it has introduced another scourge -- giant clusters of floating fire ants.  UT researchers Alex Wild and Larry Gilbert were featured in the New York Times and Washington Post, among other outlets, sharing the science behi...
BFL continues work with Drought-Net

BFL continues work with Drought-Net

We're beginning our second year of work with Drought-Net, a global collaboration to examine community sensitivity to drought. Droughts are expected to not only become more common but also more severe as a result of climate change. By comparing the plant communities under rainout shelters with those outside them, we can get an idea of how vegetation...
National Report Highlights Brackenridge Field Lab

National Report Highlights Brackenridge Field Lab

Brackenridge Field Lab’s national reputation—as a premiere site for research on invasive species, evolution and behavior, biodiversity, climate change and drought, as well as for education and outreach—was underscored with the lab’s inclusion in a report by the National Academy of Sciences on the critical role of field stations.   Th...
Regents approve plan to expand Stengl Lost Pines Biological Station

Regents approve plan to expand Stengl Lost Pines Biological Station

The UT Board of Regents approved a plan to expand the 208-acre Stengl Lost Pines Biological Station. Read more at My Statesman >>